‘Through Our Eyes’ shares Stories of people with Learning Disabilities

‘Through Our Eyes’ shares the stories of people with learning disabilities in Wales through photographs and videos. A celebration event in the Senedd on the 24th November from 2-4pm will officially launch the exhibition.

The exhibition, running in the Senedd [1] until the 4th February, challenges perceptions and stereotypes by highlighting the valued roles and activities of people with learning disabilities in our communities.

Through our exhibition you can learn about the things that matter to our community and the work that our self-advocates do to create a more inclusive and accessible world for everyone.

3rd December, International Day of Disabled People, will see the launch of our image library which contains free to use images of people with learning disabilities going about their lives. The images celebrate achievements in employment, volunteering, sport, education and other areas of life. They highlight the importance of self-advocacy, human rights and access to the essentials in life that most people take for granted.

Through Our Eyes represents people with learning disabilities in their own words and as they see themselves.

Join us in changing the picture.

All Wales Chief Executive, Joe Powell said, “‘For too long other people have owned the narrative for people with learning disabilities. If other people own our narrative then we become whatever others say we
are. This has contributed to negative, deficit centred perceptions which have kept us isolated from our communities and unable to take our place as active and equal citizens in Wales. Our members wanted to change this, by portraying learning disability ‘Through Our Eyes’.

The Covid 19 pandemic highlighted the fact that many people with learning disabilities are viewed as having lives that are of less value and quality than other citizens. This was especially prevalent in the issuing of highly inappropriate DNR notices for some.

I hope this project helps, not only to show that people with learning disabilities are ‘people first’ but are human beings, with hopes, dreams and aspirations like anyone else.’

Lucy Hinksman is the Through Our Eyes project worker and a photographer with a learning disability. Lucy said, “It is amazing how people with learning disabilities and autism have a great lifestyle and I was proud to go around Wales and capture everyone’s lives, doing things like sport, employment and being parents.

The exhibition shows the things we want to tell the world about. We are all equal and we all have a voice. We should have the opportunities to do the same things that everyone else can. People with learning disabilities can do things that other people wouldn’t expect, like wdriving a tractor and winning medals doing sports.

We hope that people can see all of the incredible things that we do and realise that everyone can achieve their goals in life.”

Images:

James at Carmarthen train station. Accessible information supports people with learning disabilities to travel independently

© Lucy Hinksman/Through Our Eyes

David on a walk in Brecon. His basketball team won silver at the 2017 Special Olympics.

© Natasha Hirst/Through Our Eyes

Levi and her daughter at Burry Port, after playing on the beach. © Natasha Hirst/Through Our Eyes

Anna, from Pembrokeshire, sets up her archery bow for training with her team at Derby University.

© Natasha Hirst/Through Our Eyes

Dean takes a break during football training with the Clarby Warriors.
© Lucy Hinksman/Through Our Eyes

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